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We often make the mistake of ignoring certain signs, resulting in future illness. The truth is, we often do not take action until problematic symptoms surface — even though, there may have been signs all along. While focusing on your overall health, your hair and skin will often display warning signs.

Sometimes, you need to pay attention to your hair, in order to understand the big picture.

 

What Is Your Hair Saying About Your Health?


When you look at your head of hair, what do you see? Does anything seem abnormal?

If so, you may need to pay closer attention to what your health needs are. It's important to 'listen' to your body — as it often tries to tell us when something isn't right. Regardless of the situation, prevention is always the best form of treatment, so be aware of the following signs, and what they mean.

 

 1. You're too stressed

 

We all lose hair each and every day — in fact, it's normal to shed up to 100 strands daily. On that note, have you noticed that you're losing more hair than usual? Whether your hair is falling out in clumps or is thinning, this often means that you're suffering from high levels of stress.

Stress comes in many forms — both physical and psychological. Whether you're suffering from depression or are going through a pregnancy, stress can significantly impact your hair. The key here, is to get the stressor under control. Figure out what triggers your stress, and then remedy that issue. As long as you can overcome this stressor, your hair will grow back in a matter of months.

 

2.  You're eating too many junk foods

 

No surprise here — junk food is bad for your hair. Remember, your hair is very much alive, so it requires ample levels of nutrition. If you're living off highly processed foods, then you will not do your body, or your hair any good. It's all about moderation, so be sure to consume a diet that mainly consists of whole foods.

 

3. You're not getting enough fat and protein

Both healthy fats and protein are imperative to healthy hair. Fat, for instance, plays a key role in vitamin absorption. Fat-soluble vitamins, including vitamin D, require enough fat in the body. Be sure to choose the right types of fat, including foods like avocados, fish, dark chocolate, olive oil, and coconut oil.



4. You're dehydrated

Believe it or not, most patients that visit the doctor, complaining of fatigue and headaches, are just dehydrated. The average individual does not drink enough water during the day, resulting in all kinds of health issues. If you find that your hair is dry, and you're suffering from nights sweats and fatigue, a lack of water may be to blame.

You are supposed to consume half of your bodyweight in ounces daily — meaning, if you weigh 140 pounds, you need to drink 70 ounces of water daily, which is around 4.5 pints. This number will increase the more active you are. If you're bored of plain water, jazz it up with fruit and herbs.

 

5. Your hormones are out-of-whack

 

Hormonal issues contribute to a wide range of health-related issues. Both men and women can suffer from what's known as androgenic and androgenetic alopecia. If you're beginning to notice hair loss, you may have too much testosterone. Normally, men suffer from balding more often than women, due to higher levels of oestrogen in females.

With that being said, women can most certainly be affected by hormonal imbalances. In addition to hair loss, you may notice dark hair growing on your upper lip or chin. If you're concerned that this may be the case, seek the opinion of your doctor. They can perform hormone testing to see what the issue may be.

The human body is connected — each system influences another. If you are noticing that your hair is dry, brittle, or thin, it's important to ask yourself, why? If your hair is suffering, the rest of your body may be as well. Understand what the root cause may be, then take appropriate action. The worst thing you can do, is nothing at all. Listen to what your hair is trying to tell you, and you'll quickly be on your way to positive health.